The Other Woman

Director: Nick Cassavetes

Starring: Cameron Diaz, Leslie Mann, Kate Upton, Nicki Minaj, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Don Johnson, Taylor Kinney

Rated: PG-13 (mature thematic material, sexual references and language)

After discovering her boyfriend is married, Carly soon meets the wife he’s been betraying. And when yet another love affair is discovered, all three women team up to plot revenge on the three-timing S.O.B.

 

The Other Woman

By Matt Greene

TOW was originally rated R, but whatever comedic teeth the movie had in its first version were clearly left on the cutting room floor. As it is, the movie teeters on being funny instead of actually being funny. The three actresses are giving their all, but their efforts can’t fix the final edit. Ultimately, a couple of funny scenes don’t forgive a movie full of awfully predictable writing and sloppy direction.

It’s the story of three women who meet, become friends and seek revenge on the man cheating them. It’s a story of rich, privileged people being selfish and obnoxious. It’s a story of women becoming friends minutes after meeting each other. It’s editing and music are dated and jarring, leaving no connection to the audience. It bombards us with jokes…if only those jokes were funny. Sadly, other than a couple strong physical comedy moments, it’s largely laughless.

Towards the end of TOW, one of the women chides the cheating husband/boyfriend, saying, “None of those women or money or objects can fill the hole inside you”. If only the creators of this film had heeded this advice. Sure, its casted well, Upton and Diaz doing their best, and Mann almost making something out of nothing. Unfortunately, instead of fully leaning on its talented cast to run comically wild, it relies on outdated story devices (Freeze frames?! Retrospectives?! THREE MONTAGES?!) and cheap humor (Hidden laxatives?! Seriously?!) to fill the soulless hole in its cinematic heart. Cliched, sloppy, and rushed, TOW is a hot mess.

Rating: 1.5 out of 5 stars

 

The Other Woman

By Cole Schneider

“The Other Woman” is an impressive movie. Is there any other way to describe a film, which has three female leads and still doesn’t pass the Bechdel Test? For nearly two hours we follow three ladies who track a man’s adulterous affairs and seek revenge on him by supposedly hilarious means. I don’t want to be the male film critic who passes negative judgement on the few chick-flicks taking top honors at the box office, and to be clear, I’m not. I don’t mind a good “girl” movie just as I don’t mind a good movie of any kind, but this isn’t a good movie.

I want Hollywood to keep producing films with female-driven issues and female leads, but this is simply trash. It’s the same kind of trash I recently wrote about in my “That Awkward Moment” review. Both films feature three characters with little more on their mind than stereotypical gender-nonsense and neither film is interesting or funny. The primary difference is the gender which is portrayed recklessly. I want Hollywood to make “girl” movies, but specifically I want Hollywood to make intelligent “girl” movies with well developed characters who think and act upon something larger than their own cliched selfishness opposite a cliched man-villain.

Leslie Mann wrangles as many laughs as possible out of a bereft script and there are moments–especially the end sequence–where director Nick Cassavetes channels the stylish intrigue of his father, but most impressive about “The Other Woman” remains its shameless sexism pointed directly at an audience it has marketed itself toward. It takes guts to lack morals this much.

Rating: 1 out of 5 stars.

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